Budapest Part 3: Nightlife and Food

This entry is part 9 of 13 in the series Bucharest to Brussels:

  1. Bucharest to Brussels – Introduction and Our Route
  2. Munich, Germany
  3. All Roads Lead to Rome, Part I
  4. Bucharest, Romania
  5. Brasov and Dracula’s (Bram) Castle
  6. Smaller Cities of Transylvania
  7. Budapest part 1: Sziget Festival
  8. Budapest Part 2: Daylife
  9. Budapest Part 3: Nightlife and Food
  10. Vienna and Salzburg, Austria
  11. Berlin, Germany
  12. Beer Around Belgium
  13. Biking to the Best Beer in the World

While the days were fun and quite busy, we also had a great time at night in Budapest as well. First, the food was delicious, and was surprisingly quite varied. We didn’t have too many meals of Hungarian food, because it is a bit similar to German and Romanian food, neither of which are really our cup of tea. However, the goulash we had was quite tasty!

Delicious Georgian food

Delicious Georgian food

(Probably because we had just spent two weeks in Romania) we were really excited for all of the international offerings. We had really good Thai food the first day, as well as some tasty American burgers, and my favorite, Georgian food! One of my all-time favorite dishes, from living in Armenia near the Georgian border, is the adjarian hadjapori, which is basically a bread boat with tasty cheese and a partially cooked egg inside. While it doesn’t sound that appetizing, it is delicious (it’s the cheese and the garlic bread that make it). They also had khinkali, which are large, stuffed dumplings. We ended up going there twice because it was so good, and it may have satisfied my cravings for a few weeks.

Tower of old VHS taps

Tower of old VHS taps

One of the coolest parts of the nightlife were the ruin bars. We (by chance) stayed just near the Jewish district (which has the second largest synagogue in the world). Also next door is the ruin bar district, which is pretty much a hipster’s dream. Ruin bars got their origins when someone decided to open a bar in a run-down building, factory, car-park, etc. They typically had random chairs and tables and couches and decorations – whatever the proprietor could round up. Nowadays, there are still several underground ruin bars operating in this area, although they are a bit harder to find.

Inside of Szimpla Kert

Inside of Szimpla Kert

We went on a free ruin bar “tour” that took us to several different ones, which was fun to see. We also got to meet several travelers from around the globe.The last stop on the bar tour was the most famous and “original” ruin bar, Szimpla Kert. This place was incredible. It was made up of about two floors of an old apartment building, and each room was decorated differently with random furniture. They also had a room full of old computer monitors playing random patterns, a sculpture made of VHS tapes, and several old cars that you could have your drinks in. It was a really fun experience, and with the cheap beer being sold, really made for a great compliment to our days in Budapest!

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